Speaker Series

Schedule Spring 2017

9 February
"Regime Type, Agricultural Policy and Political Stability"
Henry Thomson, Postdoctoral Prize Research Fellow, Nuffield College, University of Oxford

23 March
“Digital controls and violent state repression”
Anita Gohdes, Asst. Professor of International Relations, University of Zurich

20 April
"The Death Camp Eldorado: Political and Economic Effects of Wartime Property Transfers"
Evgeny Finkel, Asst. Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, George Washington University

4 May
“Where do violent norms come from? An institutional analysis of rebellion”
Zoe Marks, Chancellor’s Fellow and Lecturer, University of Edinburgh

18 May
"The Benefits of Bad Behavior: Global Accountability and Local Performance in International Peacebuilding”
Susanna Campbell, Asst. Professor at the School of International Service, American University

For the 2011-2016 lectures, see Previous Speaker Series.


Upcoming events

Where do violent norms come from? An institutional analysis of rebellion

Zoe Marks

Chancellor’s Fellow and Lecturer, University of Edinburgh

Zoe Marks is a Chancellor’s Fellow and Lecturer at the Centre of African Studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she is the Director of the MSc in African Studies and the Global Development Academy. Dr. Marks has also previously been a Fellow at the Harvard Kennedy School Women and Public Policy Program. She received her PhD in Politics at the University of Oxford, where her research examined the internal dynamics of rebellion in Sierra Leone. Her research currently focuses on conflict and civil war, armed groups, gender relations and post-conflict development in Sub-Saharan Africa.  

Thursday, 4 May 2017

13.15-15.00

Sal. 2, Gamla Torget 3

Open to the public.


Previous events

The Death Camp Eldorado: Political and Economic Effect of Wartime Property Transfers

Evgeny Finkel

Asst. Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, George Washington University

Professor Evgeny Finkel is currently working on several projects that study the causes and impact of political violence in Eastern Europe and Israel/Palestine. He works at the intersection of political science and history, and is interested in how institutions and individuals respond to violence, crisis and rapid change. His dissertation was awarded the American Political Science Association Gabriel A. Almond Award for the best dissertation in comparative politics. He is the author of Ordinary Jews: Choice and Survival during the Holocaust (Princeton University Press, forthcoming 2017). His APSR article on the same topic compared trajectories pf anti-Nazi Jewish resistance groups in across different ghettos during the Holocaust. He has also published in journal such as Comparative Political Studies, Comparative Politics, and Democratization, amongst others. 

Thursday, 20 April 2017

Digital Controls and Violent State Repression

Anita Gohdes

Assistant Professor in International Relations, University of Zurich

Anita Gohdes is an Assistant Professor of International Relations at the Department of Political Science at the University of Zurich. She was a postdoctoral research fellow at the Belfer Center and the Harvard Kennedy School, and received her PhD at the University of Mannheim. Her dissertation was awarded the 2014-2016 Walter Isard Dissertation Award. Professor Gohdes’ research interests include political violence, state repression and human rights. She is currently working on a book project that focuses on how digital communication influences government strategies in repression. Professor Gohdes has published articles in journals such as Journal of Peace Research, Journal of Conflict Resolution and Journal of Human Rights, and is a field consultant for Human Rights Data Analysis Group (HRDAG). 

Thursday, 23 March 2017

Regime Type, Agricultural Policy and Political Stability

Henry Thomson

Postdoctoral Prize Research Fellow, Nuffield College, University of Oxford

Henry Thomson is currently a Postdoctoral Prize Research Fellow in Politics at Nuffield College, University of Oxford. Before starting his position at Oxford, he studied Political Science and Applied Economics at the University of Minnesota, International Relations at the Free University of Berlin, and Political Science and German at Victoria University of Wellington. Dr. Thomson’s research interests center on the political economy of democratization and authoritarianism. His dissertation, on agricultural policy and authoritarian regime durability, won the 2015 Juan Linz Prize for best dissertation in comparative democratization from the American Political Science Association. Other projects look at rural inequality and civil conflict, economic policy and repression under authoritarianism, and urban unrest.

Thursday, 9 February 2017

Speaker Series

The Speaker Series lectures are open to the public. Unless otherwise indicated, all talks are held at 13.15-15.00 in Sal. 2, Gamla Torget 3. Most welcome!